Embroidered Toast by Judith G Klausner

Judith G Klausner, Toast Embroidery #1: Egg on Toast, 2010. Toast, thread, paper.

Judith G Klausner, Toast Embroidery #1: Egg on Toast, 2010. Toast, thread, paper.

Judith G Klausner, Embroidered Toast #2: Butter (To Go), 2010. Toast, thread, paper, napkin, plastic knife.

Judith G Klausner, Embroidered Toast #2: Butter (To Go), 2010. Toast, thread, paper, napkin, plastic knife.

Judith G Klausner, Embroidered Toast #3: Mold, 2010. Toast, thread, paper.

Judith G Klausner, Embroidered Toast #3: Mold, 2010. Toast, thread, paper.

Considering today’s toast themed post on Tibi Tibi Neuspiel (found here), I couldn’t resist quickly re-posting these embroidered toast pieces by Judith G Klausner. I came across her images via Colossal Art & Design, one of my favourite places on the internet and a treasure trove of ridiculously interesting things.

Be sure to check out the rest of Judith G Klausner’s marvellous work as well, from cameos carved into the icing of Oreos, to a bird made from the wings of honeybees and cicadas, to flowers made from nail clippings and baby teeth.

All images via Colossal.

Elsewhere on the Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things:

Map of Canada made from processed cheese on white bread made by Tibi Tibi Neuspiel.

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7 thoughts on “Embroidered Toast by Judith G Klausner

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