Irina Werning: Back to the Future

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Maartje in 1990 and 2011, Amsterdam

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Oscar in 1978 and 2010, Buenos Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Lucia in 1956 and 2010, Buenos Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Cecile in 1987 and 2010, France

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Campbell Twins in 1976 and 2011, London

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Carol in 1960 and 2011, NY

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Christoph in 1990 and 2011, Berlin Wall

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Giorgia in 1982 and 2011, Paris

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Damian in 1989 and 2010, London

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: La Negra in 1980 and 2010, Buenos Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Lulu and G in 1980 and 2010, Buenos Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Nico in 1986 and 2010, Bueno Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: My Parents in 1970 and 2010, Bueno Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Pancho in 1983 and 2010, Buenos Aires

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Riff Raff in 1976 and 2011, London

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series

Irina Werning, Back to the Future series: Sarah and Jim in 1989 and 2011, Boston

Re-creating old photographs of yourself seems to be something that has become rather trendy around the web lately: check out zefrank’s Young Me/Now Me project, childhood photos of comedians recreated for this article in the Guardian, or the Age Maps series by artist Bobby Neel Adams, just to name a few.

Working squarely in this vein, Argentinian artist Irina Werning has become something of a web sensation with her Back to the Future series. Although the concept might not be particularly unique, her artful execution of the re-created photographs makes her work stand out from the crowd. Werning’s incredible attention to detail, sensitive re-creation of colour and light, and careful selection of engaging source photographs makes her series a delight to browse. I’m not convinced she’s really accomplishing anything particularly profound in these photographs, but they are pretty dang interesting to look through. It’s also fascinating to think about the reasons why these past/present  photographic projects are so popular right now, and what it might say about the cultural obsession with nostalgia and our personal sense of connection to the past.

// All photographs via the artist’s website, found here and here (more images from the series can also be found on her website).

Elsewhere on the Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things:

Ulric Collette Laval 56 Vincent 29

9 thoughts on “Irina Werning: Back to the Future

  1. This is amazing! I think my favorites are Maria Jose and Christoph … the reflection in the mirror and the missing Berlin wall are fantastic. Thank you for posting this!

  2. Pingback: Fascinating faces: Ulric Collette’s ‘Portraits génétiques’ | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  3. Pingback: Abandoned suitcases of insane asylum patients | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  4. Pingback: Unusual retro beauty contests | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  5. Pingback: Strange and lovely, Part One: Translucent bodies in the sculptures of Christina Bothwell | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  6. Pingback: A Map of a Woman’s Heart, 1833-1842 | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  7. Pingback: Adorable mug shot of 19th century pear-nibbling toddler | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

  8. Pingback: She lived in someone’s locket | The Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s