Opulent taxidermy made by Idiots

Half of a taxidermy lion with gold dripping from it.

The Idiots are an artistic collective made up of Afke Golsteijn and Floris Bakker, whose work, as they describe, is “characterized by the use of animal material exquisitely sculpted into natural positions and combined seamlessly with rich materials such as embroidery and pearls.” Their artworks play with all sorts of quirky taxidermy, such as the exposed fox spine of Thanatos and Hypnos (2011), the parrot headphones of Head Phones (Stilte!) (2009), or the slick oil drop bird in Oilbird (2008); however, I am particularly taken by their combination of lions with opulent gemstones (Geologische Vondst II2012) [below] and what looks like molten gold (but is really ceramic glass) (Ophelia, 2005) [above]. These works playfully hint at the treasures within these majestic creatures, but also reveal the macabre impulse to remove beautiful things from the world for the aesthetic pleasure of humans. Although these sculptures are pretty dark, I can’t help but be seduced by the unsettling yet imaginative combinations of materials that they employ.

Bottom half of a taxidermy lion filled with amethyst. Bottom half of a taxidermy lion filled with amethyst. Bottom half of a taxidermy lion filled with amethyst.

// All images via the Idiots website.

 

Elsewhere on the Museum of Ridiculously Interesting Things:

Jane Howarth's Bonne Bouche

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8 thoughts on “Opulent taxidermy made by Idiots

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