Burnt and melted wax figures after the 1925 fire at Madame Tussauds in London

Photograph of six wax figures and broken body parts damaged from 1929 fire at Madame Tussaud's in London.

I’m so unsettled and captivated by this incredible photograph of wax figures burnt and melted after the massive 1925 fire that destroyed Madame Tussauds wax museum in London. I think wax models alone are already pretty creepy, but I don’t think even the Chamber of Horrors can touch the pathos of this unintentionally gruesome scene. With missing heads and appendages, charred skin and clothing in disarray, the uncanny wax models truly look like the causalities of some great trauma.

I’ve been trying to unearth more photographs of destroyed wax models from the fire, with no luck. However, I did come across this newsreel which shows the destruction of the fire, and some of the wax figures within the rubble. 

Almost as interesting are some of the colorful quotes taken from 1925 news stories about the fire:

// Image from Wassenbeelden Museum (via Theory of Disease/firsttimeuser). Photographer unknown.

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20 thoughts on “Burnt and melted wax figures after the 1925 fire at Madame Tussauds in London

  1. When I saw this in my feed, I thought that the sculptures would be more mangled… I see now that that would’ve had less impact – this is far more disturbing.

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